Dec.01
2017

Become the Best Remote Manager You Can Be

Through getting involved with the thousands of community members on this website, I can’t help but notice a considerable amount of people who are turning to remote working as a means of improving their current financial situations. With this method one of the most popular routes of the twenty-first century there are so many advantages to becoming a remote worker.

However, for a smaller business encouraging this route for their employees and subsequently supporting them correctly in this role, can also pay off dividends on their profit margins! It is all about ensuring that the designated remote manager is the best person for the position and fully respects the people who he or she is managing remotely.

What Does Remote Working Entail?

A remote worker usually works for a company but doesn’t attend the company’s premises to carry out their work, typically working from home instead. This doesn’t mean to say that they aren’t a part of the group – far from it, it just means that they don’t sit in the facility and aren’t visually seen around the building.

They do however still spend a fair bit of time communicating with other members and managers by way of conference calling and messaging for example. Their job still needs completing, and deadlines are always there to be worked to; it is merely all done from a different environment than what is usually considered the norm.

The Benefits of Remote Working for Smaller Businesses

The smaller of businesses will no doubt benefit from having remote employees for many reasons. Firstly, they do not need to provide an office space for those employees and can, therefore, run their business from smaller premises. This reduces rent and overhead costs immediately.

Secondly, they have no huge staff bills to consider. Though remote workers are indeed staff and paid a wage, without an office, there is no need for employing additional staff, such as Receptionists, Administrators, and Cleaners for example. This means only the team that are necessary are on the wages bill.

Thirdly, the work ethic changes when employees can work from a place of their choice meaning improved performance with jobs getting done on time and more successfully when everybody is happy with their working situation.

What is a Remote Manager’s Role?

Head of these remote employees is the remote manager. He or she has a responsibility to ensure that those employees who aren’t seen in the offices daily are still being connected and supported and are ultimately working to their required schedules. A remote manager is primarily responsible for bringing everyone together and boosting the productivity of such employees.

A Remote Worker Needs to Be on The Ball

However, to keep the continuity and ensure work production levels continue to be progressive, the allocated remote manager must ensure that all the company’s remote employees stay the right path. This means a remote manager has the following responsibilities:

To keep up employee morale: It is vital that a remote manager makes every single employee feel critical in the company. When a person is disconnected from the daily routine of the office, they are also disconnected from the social hub that such an environment produces. Though this can be addressed by having all remote workers link up regularly, it is still not quite the same as being presented with one another to bounce ideas off in conversation.

There is also the small matter of time zones to consider as well if you have remote employees in different ones. An effective manager should keep on top of this and spot any potential areas where this could cause certain employees problems and work on improving it rather than letting it develop further.

Organizing a weekly online get together at a time to suit all is a good idea to make your employees know that you are there for them and that there are indeed others like them working in the exact same way as they are!

To not succumb to micromanaging employees: Though this is a slightly different management role and will take time getting used to it, never be tempted to begin managing your remote employee’s schedules or working days as you perhaps would with an office based employee.

The whole idea of most people choosing the remote route is to work differently to that of working in an office. If you start trying to change this and working on molding them to rigid and constricted office hours, they may well feel as though they should just head back to an office, and ultimately leave your employment.

Give your remote workers the benefit of the doubt here. Is the workload being met adequately? If so, isn’t that precisely what your company needs? Look at the finished product rather than focusing on the time patterns in which to achieve this outcome. Could you perhaps implement a weekly catch up and checklist to ensure that each remote worker is hitting the targets expected of them instead of requesting a rundown on how they spend each working hour?

It may come as a surprise when discovering that remote workers put in an average of up to four additional more working hours each week in choosing this working method. Don’t forget that many remote workers will begin working at their desks even before the average office-based worker has thrown back the duvet covers!